Fun and Fabulous #1: Keep Moving

Physical activity is an irreplaceable part of a healthy lifestyle regardless of our age.

Starting from childhood all the way up to old age, physical activity, and regular exercise are vital for both physical and mental health and wellbeing.

 

Life after 60 does not rule out exercise and physical activity, but most people don't know how to keep moving at this point. We are going to show you. 

 

Get a walker

Walkers scan be of huge help for people whose mobility and flexibility are affected due to arthritis, osteoporosis, and other health problems.

 

Not only are walkers easy to push, but there is also a seat to take some rest and space to put the bag and groceries. 

Physical activity is an irreplaceable part of a healthy lifestyle regardless of our age.

 

Starting from childhood all the way up to old age, physical activity, and regular exercise are vital for both physical and mental health and wellbeing.

 

Life after 60 does not rule out exercise and physical activity, but most people don't know how to keep moving at this point. We are going to show you.

Photo of Woman using a walker

 

The pushed down wheel walker allows you to move and remain active, even at an older age.

  

Consult a doctor

If you haven't been active before, it's never too late to start. Men and women with a chronic health problem may want to consult a doctor about physical activity.

Photo of Doctor

 

The healthcare provider may also suggest the most beneficial activities for your condition or activities to avoid.

 

Practice yoga

When the term yoga comes to mind, we immediately think of complicated postures that are too difficult to execute, even for younger people.

 

But, yoga has hundreds of postures you can try. Some are, indeed, complicated, while others are not.

Photo of Couple doing yoga

 

Yoga improves blood flow, flexibility, aids stress management, and may even help reduce pain, improve the functionality of joints, among other things.

 

Sign up for yoga class for seniors and try it out.

 

Engage in low-impact exercises

Low-impact exercises are easy on your joints, build strength, improve heart rate, and improve balance and flexibility.

 

On the other hand, high-impact exercises at an older age would create too much pressure and pain on the joints.

Photo of Man jogging

 

Some low-impact activities you may want to practice include pilates, swimming, stationary cycling, gentle stretching exercises, and tai-chi. 

  

Make your daily life active 

A common misconception is that physical activity revolves around exercise only.

 

Exercise is just one segment of physical activity.

 

It’s not about exercising for 20 to 30 minutes and spending the rest of the day on the couch.

  

We need to make our daily life as active as we can.

 

Of course, this depends on your overall health, but there are many ways to raise activity levels even when we are not exercising.

Photo of Man and Woman dancing

 

For example, there is housework, work around the yard, shopping for groceries, walking the dog, starting an active hobby, playing with grandchildren, among others.

 

Stay hydrated

In order to keep moving, it is necessary to make wiser lifestyle choices.

 

Make sure to drink enough water during the day to allow the body to function properly.

Photo of Women having tea

 

Besides staying hydrated, you should also eat a well-balanced diet and get enough sleep.

 

All these seemingly "ordinary" things play a major role in your fitness levels. 

 

Conclusion

We should always strive to keep moving, even at an older age.

 

There are many activities and exercises to do in our 60s to promote our flexibility, maintain weight in a healthy range, and support heart function. 

 

Download Keep Moving Brochure

button to download "Keep Moving" guide

 


 About the Writer
Photo of Dr. Ahmed Zayed
Dr. Ahmed Zayed holds a baccalaureate of Medicine and Surgery. He has completed his degree at the University of Alexandria, Egypt.
Dr. Ahmed believes in providing knowledgeable information to readers. Other than his passion for writing, Dr. Ahmed spends his time outside the hospital, either reading or at the gym.
His articles are featured in Chicago Tribune, Consumer Health Digest and Huffington Post, just to name a few.

 

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